They say that marijuana legalization is bad, but...

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According to the Colorado Department of Public Safety 2016 http://cdpsdocs.state.co.us/ors/docs/reports/2016-SB13-283-Rpt.pdf -Total revenue from taxes, licenses, and fees increased from $76,152,468 in 2014 to $135,100,465 in 2015 (+77%). Excise tax revenue dedicated to school capital construction assistance was $35,060,590 in 2015. - Colorado’s property crime rate decreased 3%, from 2,580 (per 100,000 population) in 2009 to 2,503 in 2014. -Colorado’s violent crime rate decreased 6%, from 327 (per 100,000 population) in 2009 to 306 in 2014. -The total number of marijuana arrests decreased by 46% between 2012 and 2014, from 12,894 to 7,004. Marijuana possession arrests, which make up the majority of all marijuana arrests, were nearly cut in half (‐47%). Marijuana sales arrests decreased by 24%, while arrests for marijuana production did not change appreciably (‐2%). Marijuana arrests that were unspecified, meaning the specific reason for the arrest was not noted by law enforcement, went down by 42%. -As a share of all arrests in Colorado, marijuana was responsible for 6% of all arrests in 2012 and 3% in 2014. -The number of marijuana arrests decreased by 51% for Whites, 33% for Hispanics, and 25% for African‐Americans. The marijuana arrest rate for African‐Americans (348 per 100,000) was almost triple that of Whites (123 per 100,000) in 2014. Other jurisdictions that legalized the recreational marijuana industry have experienced similar declines in violent crime. In Washington State, violent crime rates decreased by 10 percent from 2011 to 2014. Portland, Oregon, saw crime rates drop since legalizing the recreational marijuana industry as well.
https://coloradopolitics.com/despite-claims-data-show-legalized-marijuana-not-increased-crime-rates/